3 Ways Dry Shampoo Can Make Your Day Easier in the Salon

Shannon Moore, NCMG  Director of Grooming and Education, Espree Animal Products

You’re not imagining it: Dry shampoos are all the rage and are making their way into the pet market and grooming salons.  As professional pet stylists, we know that nothing beats a good old fashion bath and brush out, but dry shampoos definitely have their place in grooming salons and on your grooming table. Here are 3 ways a dry shampoo can help you on in the salon:

  1. Absorb Excess Oil from the Skin and Coat

Dry shampoo is a great tool for those pooches that have overactive oil glands.  I use dry shampoo before the bath and let them sit for 15-30 minutes to let the dry shampoo do its magic. I take a brush and lightly brush through the coat to help distribute the dry shampoo throughout the coat to absorb the excess oil.  Then bathe and style as desired.

  1. Give the Coat More Volume, Thickness, and Texture

Everyone has those clients that come in with a picture of a full-coated breed and want their barely maintained pooch to look just like that picture.  After explaining that there is not enough coat on their pup, you can turn to a shampoo to help add more body to the coat and achieve the look they want.  I really love to use it on the legs of dogs that have a “not so great coat” to give that added boost of volume and texture. It is also fantastic to use at the occiput to get hair to stand up when you have floppy head hair. Just make sure you do not get it in their eyes.

  1. De-matting

Yes, you read that correctly.  Dry shampoo works its magic on a matted coat.  Simply spray the matted area and use a slicker brush to help separate and divide the coat.  It works especially well if you have an undercoated breed with a packed coat that you cannot get through.  Saturate the coat with dry shampoo, separate and divide with your favorite slicker brush, then use a force dryer on the coat.  Dry shampoo used as a de-matting tool needs to be done before the bath so you can wash out the product.

Even though we aren’t using dry shampoo to freshen up a pet, there are many ways a dry shampoo can make our day a little easier in the salon.  And, at the end of the day, you can use it on your own hair to freshen up if you need to.

4 Ways To Use Espree’s Luxury Remoisturizer Conditioner

Shannon Moore, NCMG, Director of Grooming Education, Espree Animal Products, Southlake TX

Everyone has their favorite products to use for different coat issues. I have always considered myself a “collector” when it comes to grooming products and equipment.  I want my conditioners to have the capability of turning a dry, brittle coat into a beautiful one by providing some serious hydration.  Espree’s Luxury Remoisturizer Conditioner has become my “go to” conditioner to promote moisture and manageability while locking in hydration.

Here are 4 different ways to use this versatile conditioner:

  1. Regular Conditioner with a dilution rate of 32:1. The Luxury Remoisturizer is recommended for all coat types. Used at this dilution rate it will keep the coat texture true to type.  It also has the ability to replace moisture lost through bathing, blow-drying, and exposure to sun and wind.  It reduces matting and promotes hair growth.
  2. Deep Conditioning Treatment with a dilution rate of 16:1. This type of treatment is ideal for any coat that is cottony, silky, or mats easily, and dogs going through coat change. I warm the diluted conditioner to luke warm and apply to coat making certain the product is distributed from root to tip. Allow it to sit on the coat for 60 – 90 seconds and rinse immediately.  Slightly cool the water temperature down when rinsing the coat.  This Deep Conditioning Treatment will improve texture and shine, while keeping the coat static free.  It is a great way to control the most difficult coats while reducing matting and tangling.
  3. Detangler. Dilute 50:1. Saturate the mats and carefully separate with your fingers.  Then gently brush with a slicker section by section until you can glide a comb through the matted area.  I use it as a Detangling Spray before the bath. Conquer mats and tangles without the drama associated with detangling.
  4.  Leave In Conditioner. Dilute 50:1 and you have a very light leave in conditioner. It will hold and protect coats from matting and tangling.  Excellent for breaking down a coat while minimizing damage from gels and other styling products. It is also great to use to set a part on a drop coat.

View the Luxury Remoisturizer Conditioner on our website.

How To Grow Coat

Shannon Moore, NCMG  Director of Grooming and Education, Espree Animal Products

I am frequently asked how to grow coat on a dog?  I have an extensive background in coated breeds as I grew up raising Yorkshire Terriers, and now I raise and show Bichon Frise. I hear some pretty interesting concoctions regarding expediting coat growth.  Years ago, many people would joke around saying I could grow coat on an onion if I tried.   I thought I would share a few of my simple, yet effective ways that have worked for me.

Whether you have a show dog, contest dog, or a client dog that you want to grow coat on, keep your expectations realistic.  My goal is always about an inch of coat growth every 4 weeks.  Average coat growth on a heathy coat is an inch every 6 weeks.  But, if you want to expedite coat growth you must be consistent with whatever regiment you choose.

A very simple way to expedite coat growth is keep the coat clean.  Every time I do maintenance baths, I always condition the coat.  This helps lock in moisture and improves the elasticity of the coat making it stronger. Often, I will condition the dog and wrap them in a warm towel for about 10 minutes, then rinse.  Also, never brush the coat when it is dirty as it will break.  I typically bathe and condition a dog I am trying to grow coat on twice weekly. You must be consistent.  Trust me, there are many times I come home after a long day and the last thing I want to do is bathe my show dog.  But, I do it anyway.  Consistency is the key to success!

If I find, I am still struggling for growth, I might add some nutritional supplementation to their diet as well.  A good omega added to the food daily never hurts to keep the skin in coat in great condition.

Scissoring Spray

Shannon Moore, NCMG  |  Director of Grooming and Education, Espree Animal Products

One of my favorite things to do is hand scissor a dog into a beautiful pattern.  Groomers are artist. We have a gift of being able to create a gorgeous piece of work using the hair.  It goes without saying that dog must be clean and the skin and coat must be in good condition in order to accomplish this.  But, what else does it take to create our beautiful finished product?  Choosing the right equipment is necessary.  That doesn’t mean it has to be the most expensive, but it does need to be in good working order and properly maintained.  Choosing shears that work best for you and your hand is vital too. In addition,  we need to be able to choose the right products for the coat type. I also believe it is important to use a scissoring spray when styling a pet.

Rather than allowing a coat to work against you, scissoring spray will help the coat work with you. It not only will help reduce the static, but it will also allow the coat to be more pliable. Remember, you do not want the coat to be damp or wet, but rather a light mist so the coat will stand up and allow you to scissor the dog.  The use of scissor spray throughout the groom helps create a smoother finish on the dog because the coat is working in your favor.  It doesn’t fall down like it normally would if I did not use it. It also helps keep the coat hydrated and in the best possible condition.  Of course, I want my groom dogs walking out the door looking their best.  But, I also want that groom to look good next week, the following week, and so on. Keeping the coat in the best condition possible and putting a great finish on the dog allows me to do my best work.

Making A Dog Who Has Never Been Bathed/Groomed Feel Like New

Brian Tupes, About Pets Center  |  Salem VA

At some point you have seen it walk through the door. The dog that looks like it has been left outside its whole life and never been bathed or groomed. It is important to make this dog feel as relaxed and comfortable as possible during the whole process.

Having a relaxing calm environment is a must to reassure the pet.The way you talk to the dog will set the tone for the groom. Soft soothing tones from you will let them know there is nothing to fear,also call them by name as much as often as you can. The bathing ritual should be very relaxing for the dog.

I find the Espree line of shampoo and conditioners a great asset to establishing this experience. The scents in this line of products helps to calm an anxious dog during the bathing process. I personally want to make this time with the dog to be the most relaxing it can be.The shampoo make a great cleansing lather getting a squeeky clean coat. A little neck massage, circular hip rub down and a good butt rub seem to do the trick. It gets them into enjoying the bath.

When I get the eyes rolling up into their head I know it is working. Next the conditioner gives the coat its luster and softness without weighing down the hair. Really work it in with your fingers the dog enjoys this as well. Let the conditioner soak in a bit. If the dog has serious eye boogers dab some conditioner on with your finger ( Careful of the eyes here ) and gently rub on. In a few seconds it will loosen up those rock hard drainage clumps and makes removing them a snap. Rinse the coat thoroughly, dry well, and you will have a soft, clean, very relaxed dog to work with on your grooming table.

Puppy Grooming 101


Shannon Moore, NCMG | Director of Grooming and Education Espree Animal Products

We always see in increase in young puppies in grooming salons during the spring and early summer months.  As they appear on the books, I always find myself hoping the puppy has come from a breeder that has worked with them on grooming behavior.  Or if it is a rescue puppy, maybe the foster home has had the opportunity to work with the young dog too.  But, sometimes we aren’t so lucky for one reason or another.  It then becomes my job to teach the puppy how to get groomed and make it an enjoyable experience.  That first groom is so important.  We must keep the puppy safe and at the same time make it an enjoyable experience for the pup.

Depending on the circumstance with the pup and what I have scheduled for the day, determines if I try to get the puppy in and out of the salon quickly, or I might choose to keep it longer and put it on the table several times to get through the groom. Most often, I try to get keep the puppy for a brief period of time to help minimize stress.  I let the client know that if the puppy needs to take several breaks from being on the table, I might be calling asking for a few more hours for the visit.  When they know this ahead of time, and I explain how I want to make it an enjoyable experience as it sets the pace for grooming for the lifetime of the dog, they seem to be more understanding.  As long as I communicate with the client and let them know why I might need to keep the puppy, they are more understanding.  So not only is it our job to teach the puppy to enjoy being groomed, we have to train the client to do what is in the puppy’s best interest.

Grooming a puppy for the first time can be very scary for the young one.  If the dog is on the smaller side, I will often put the dog on my lap holding it close to my body for the first nail trim.  I lower the tone of my voice and try to comfort them and offer praise when we are finished.  I always keep one hand on the puppy at all times when on the table.  After all, being on a table can be a scary thing for the puppy.  I also take the time to massage the pads of their feet, and familiarize them with the sound of clippers and scissors.  I even will gently hold their face under the chin as if I were going to trim the face. I pet them and give them a little massage to get them to relax and begin to trust me.  If the puppy is really nervous, I might not do a full groom the first time.  Sometimes, a bath and tidy is a better choice. If this happens, I ask the owner to bring the puppy back in 2 weeks for another groom.  Even though puppies can take more time to groom, I want them in the salon every 2 to 3 weeks.  I want to take the opportunity to teach them Puppy Grooming 101 so they can enjoy coming to the salon.  After all, I plan on grooming those puppies for their life time! I want them to have fun and behave so as they mature, I can put a cute, stylish trim on them!

Don’t Sell Yourself Short on the Bath

Shannon Moore, NCMG Director of Grooming and Education, Espree Animal Products

So many times, we are over booked, running behind, or a dog who doesn’t have an appointment made it on your schedule.  You need to make up some time to stay somewhat close to your schedule, and do not know where to take a short cut. Often, I hear groomers trying to take a short cut in the bath tub thinking that one bath will get the job done if they lather that coat up a bit more. Aaahhhh, don’t do it! The bath is one of the most important parts of the entire groom.

I always recommend two baths.  Call me old school, that is okay, but think
about it. The first bath, the preliminary bath, is going to remove all the
dirt, debris, and dander from the dog.  I usually recommend a more basic shampoo with a slightly heavier surfactant to get the job done.  The second bath is designed to offer a solution.  Maybe it’s a matter of adding more silk proteins to seal the ends of a drop coat, a keratin shampoo for volume for those curly coats, or a tea tree oil shampoo to help impede bacterial and fungal growth. Whatever the reason, the first bath will get the dog clean and return the skin and coat to a more neutral state. Once the skin and coat has returned to a neutral state, the second bath, the solution oriented bath, will allow you to treat the skin and coat.

Once the dog is clean and you have the coat in the better condition, then the finish work is more attainable.  You can artfully wield your scissors and clippers to turn the pet into whatever you want.  You are able to showcase your artistic ability making the pup look fantastic and keeping the client very satisfied!