3 Ways Dry Shampoo Can Make Your Day Easier in the Salon

Shannon Moore, NCMG  Director of Grooming and Education, Espree Animal Products

You’re not imagining it: Dry shampoos are all the rage and are making their way into the pet market and grooming salons.  As professional pet stylists, we know that nothing beats a good old fashion bath and brush out, but dry shampoos definitely have their place in grooming salons and on your grooming table. Here are 3 ways a dry shampoo can help you on in the salon:

  1. Absorb Excess Oil from the Skin and Coat

Dry shampoo is a great tool for those pooches that have overactive oil glands.  I use dry shampoo before the bath and let them sit for 15-30 minutes to let the dry shampoo do its magic. I take a brush and lightly brush through the coat to help distribute the dry shampoo throughout the coat to absorb the excess oil.  Then bathe and style as desired.

  1. Give the Coat More Volume, Thickness, and Texture

Everyone has those clients that come in with a picture of a full-coated breed and want their barely maintained pooch to look just like that picture.  After explaining that there is not enough coat on their pup, you can turn to a shampoo to help add more body to the coat and achieve the look they want.  I really love to use it on the legs of dogs that have a “not so great coat” to give that added boost of volume and texture. It is also fantastic to use at the occiput to get hair to stand up when you have floppy head hair. Just make sure you do not get it in their eyes.

  1. De-matting

Yes, you read that correctly.  Dry shampoo works its magic on a matted coat.  Simply spray the matted area and use a slicker brush to help separate and divide the coat.  It works especially well if you have an undercoated breed with a packed coat that you cannot get through.  Saturate the coat with dry shampoo, separate and divide with your favorite slicker brush, then use a force dryer on the coat.  Dry shampoo used as a de-matting tool needs to be done before the bath so you can wash out the product.

Even though we aren’t using dry shampoo to freshen up a pet, there are many ways a dry shampoo can make our day a little easier in the salon.  And, at the end of the day, you can use it on your own hair to freshen up if you need to.

Shed Happens!

Shannon Moore, NCMG Espree Animal Products, Grooming Education Director, Southlake, TX

De-Shedding Is A Win-Win

All dogs shed to some degree.  It is a natural process that allows new coat to come in.  Some breeds shed all year, while others shed seasonally.  Most stylists offer a de-shed add-on service or program in the salon to help pet parents deal with the insurmountable amount of hair the pet is leaving around the house.   When clients have guests come over to their home and have dog hair everywhere, especially on their furniture, it can be embarrassing for them.  More importantly, dogs can become uncomfortable with having so much excessive coat. Having a coat that is packed with hair can contribute to the pet’s inability to regulate their own body temperature which can be dangerous during the summer and winter months. Sometimes they will become itchy or even develop a myriad of skin issues including bacterial and yeast infections. Offering a de-shedding service is necessary and advisable for all parties involved, especially the dog.

What exactly does de-shedding mean?

It is the removal of undercoat that would have eventually ended up all over the house, furniture, and your clothes.  Shedding is a natural process, so you do not want to try to stop it!  De-shedding treatments are designed to accelerate the shedding process by removing the loose coat that would eventually end up of all over the client’s home.  De-shed shampoos and treatments ideally should change the pH by lowering it from the normal 6.5 – 7.5 range. The cortex of the cuticle opens up and allows any loose coat to slip out. Espree’s Simple Shed Shampoo and Simple Shed Treatment does this. It is also enhanced with proteins and amino acids to help fortify and strengthen overworked and damaged hair, so the result is a healthy, shiny coat.  Sometimes a De-Shed Treatment can appear drying to the coat due to the reduction in pH.  I always recommend using a De-Shed Treatment or Conditioner after shampooing to help restore moisture to the skin and coat. The end result is a beautiful, healthy coat where the coat can separate and divide so the skin can breathe.  It is an all-around win-win for the dog, the client, and the pet stylist.

Recommended tools and equipment for De-Shed Services:

Espree Simple Shed Shampoo

Espree Simple Shed Treatment

High-Velocity Dryer

De-Shed Tool

Happy De-shedding!!!!

The Importance of Diluting Product Correctly

Shannon Moore, NCMG Director of Grooming Education, Espree Animal Products

Groomers work very hard for their money. We must use every tool we have at our disposal to help get that beautifully executed groom with each dog we work on. These tools are not only our clippers, scissors, and styling products, but also our shampoos and conditioners. After all, the bath is the quintessential element of a professional groom. It is the one tool that gets the pets’ skin and coat clean, healthy, and vibrant. Therefore, it is one of the most important parts to the grooming process.

It is important in any grooming salon not to waste shampoo. After all, most shampoo used by grooming professionals is concentrated and needs to be diluted. If we don’t dilute shampoo correctly, there is a lot of wasted product and that is like throwing money out the window. Diluting product correctly is important in terms of performance as well. In order to have a product provide a solution for the pet and perform as the manufacture intended, we must pay attention to the dilution rate. If the product is overdiluted, it may not have the ability to do what it should do. If the product is under diluted, take some extra time to rinse and to rehydrate the coat. It is important to remember that when you under dilute a product, there is more surfactant being used than what the manufacturer recommends. In order to keep the skin and coat in optimal condition, it is necessary to rehydrate the coat.

Once you are finished bathing for the day, take any shampoo that has been diluted and discard it in order to prevent bacteria forming in the mixing bottles. We all hate to waste shampoo, so if you have any energy left, it may be a great time to bathe your personal dog with what is left over from the day. Don’t forget to clean out those mixing bottles thoroughly to remove any product in the bottle!

The Importance Of Letting Owners Know

Shannon Moore, NCMG Director of Grooming Education, Espree Animal Products

Of course, we let the owners know when there are strange bumps and lumps popping up on the dog’s skin.  After all, we have our hands on the pets more frequently than just about anyone. The owners are almost always grateful for letting them know so they can take their pet to the vet for diagnosis and treatment.  But what about those spots that show up that we have accidentally caused (or at the time, we think we were likely to blame) ? Every groomer I know has some type of healing cream or Aloe Witch Hazel Spray to help quickly heal those areas that were brush burned or clipper burned.  It’s not like this happens every day but every once in awhile, it does happen regardless of how careful we are. We are human, we make mistakes and accidents can happen.  But did you ever stop and think that maybe it is not your fault and something medically could be going on with the pet?

Groomer’s are our own worst critics.  We immediately place the blame on ourselves or the products we have chosen to use if spots start to show up on the skin when we are grooming the pet or shortly thereafter.  I always try to provide immediate relief if I see this on a pet that I am grooming, but I also let the owner know.  If it happens more than once, I recommend the pet see their regular veterinarian for blood work.   I become suspicious of an autoimmune disease in the dog.  Sometimes what appears to be brush burn (or clipper burn) is actually something going wrong with the immune system.  The immune system plays a vital role in maintaining the body’s overall general health and resistance to disease.  Sometimes, things can go wrong with the immune system.  Normal handling and brushing can trigger an immune dysfunction with dog’s suffering from autoimmune disease.

Since environmental as well as genetic factors can “trigger” an immune dysfunction, I am more likely now to refer the dog to the vet when these unwarranted “spots” show up from normal handling and brushing.  Stepping outside of your comfort zone (of course, we don’t want to be blamed for causing these unusual skin irritations), recommending the owner takes the dog to their veterinarian may allow for proper diagnosis of an autoimmune disease that could have been left unattended for a long time!